Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (2022)

The American Diabetes Association provides education and support to people with diabetes through its Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) network nationwide. These services follow the National Standards of Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (NSDSMES). To find a service in your area that is reimbursed by the Medicare and most other insurances, please visit www.diabetes.org/findaprogram.

Understanding that people with diabetes need ongoing support even after attending DSMES, the American Diabetes Association has developed an online community-based Diabetes Support Directory. This Directory provides a listing of high-quality support options that meet the ADA support programming criteria and align with the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes.

Together with DSMES, community-based support has been linked to improved and reinforced diabetes-related knowledge; self-care skills in areas such as meal planning, physical activity, taking medication, and blood glucose monitoring; and health outcomes.

If an ADA DSMES service is not available in your area, Diabetes Support can also help to connect participants with other diabetes support resources in the community. Diabetes Support is often held in community-based settings (e.g., clinics, churches or community organizations) and are frequently peer-led by individuals who speak the language, share the culture, and come from the same communities as their participants.

Our vision:

Communities where people with diabetes learn the skills needed to thrive with this disease through the American Diabetes Association’s Recognized Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) services and remain surrounded by complementary support through community Diabetes Support– creating clinical and community linkages that are proven to have the greatest impact on health.

Support Programs Directory


Research-tested Support have findings that have been published in a peer-reviewed journal. The study must have produced one or more positive behavioral and/or psychosocial outcomes among individuals, communities, or populations. Evidence of these outcomes has been demonstrated in at least one study using an experimental or quasi-experimental design. The Research-tested support listed below meet the ADA criteria for support programming, align with the Standards of Care, and demonstrate significant positive outcomes.

Research-tested Directory

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Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (1)

Name of Program: DECIDE: Self-Management Support Program

Program Details

Program Description:
The goal of DECIDE is to help people learn how to change their behavior so they can better manage their diabetes. Incorporating the seven core diabetes self-management behaviors, the DECIDE program facilitates long-term self-management by teaching patients problem-solving as a key skill for behavior change and for incorporating self-management activities into their everyday lives. DECIDE’s evidence-based outcomes include lower A1C levels, lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and better self-care behaviors. Key outcomes also include improved health-related problem-solving skills and diabetes and CVD self-management knowledge. DECIDE provides a structured curriculum that engages patients in a step-by-step process of self-management planning and activation. Problem-based training helps patients apply diabetes self-management in the context of their daily lives and challenges. The DECIDE curriculum is delivered by either health care providers or allied health workers (for example care managers, community health workers), who complete training to become DECIDE Facilitators. The program gives DECIDE Facilitators tools and resources to support behavioral change and coach their patients. You can choose the DECIDE format that’s right for you and your population. People learn differently and have different ways of accessing information. That’s why DECIDE is available in both in-person and online formats, which can be offered separately or in combination. DECIDE is also low-literacy adapted and accessible for people with visual impairment, mild cognitive impairment, and physical impairment.

Program Settings: Virtual Hospital/Outpatient/Health Clinic, Worksite, Church/Religious site, Home, Community/Senior Center, and Telemedicine

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 1 diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English, Spanish

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Felicia Hill-Briggs
Email: decideprogram@northwell.edu
Phone: 646-766-7178
Website: www.DECIDEprogram.com

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (2)
Organization: Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute

Name of Program: Project Dulce

Program Details

(Video) The American Diabetes Association® - 80th Scientific Sessions: A Virtual Experience

Program Description:
Project Dulce is a DSMS program that relies on peer educators to facilitate group diabetes education. The peer educator is a member of a multidisciplinary healthcare team, and they come from the same community, culture, and speak the same language as the patients. All program topics essential to a DSME program are covered in the curriculum, Diabetes Among Friends, which is also low-literacy and addresses socio-cultural-economic barriers so often faced by patients as they interact with the healthcare system. The curriculum and materials are updated at least annually by clinical professionals to comply with ADA guidelines and reflect best practice.

Program Settings: Hospital/Outpatient/Health Clinic, Community/Senior Center

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English, Spanish

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Monica Ruiz-Etchings, MA
Email: Ruiz.Monica@scrippshealth.org
Phone: 858-678-7049
Website: www.scripps.org/services/metabolic-conditions/diabetes/project-dulce

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (3)
Organization: Self-Management Resource Center

Name of Program: SMRC Diabetes Self-Management Program

Program Details

Program Description:

The Diabetes Self-Management Program, (Programa de Manejo Personal de la Diabetes (Spanish), offered throughout the United States and its territories, are small group, peer led, community-based workshops. Each workshop is 2.5 hours a week for six weeks. While the programs were designed for adults with type 2 diabetes, they are also utilized by those with prediabetes and type 1 diabetes. They are highly interactive and structured so that each participant can tailor the content to their own needs and lifestyle. Better Choices Better Health-Diabetes is the same program offered via the Internet. In all three programs, participants make weekly action plans, share experiences, and help each other solve problems. Each year the content is reviewed and updated to meet current American Diabetes Association's standards.

Program Settings: Hospital/Outpatient/Health Clinic, Worksite, Church/Religious site, RD/CDE practice, Community/Senior Center, Internet

Diabetes Focus:

  • Primarily Type 2 diabetes/18+ years old
  • Pre-diabetes/18+ years old welcome
  • Type 1 diabetes/18+ years old welcome

Languages Offered: English, Spanish, Chinese

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Kate Lorig
Email: smrc@selfmanagementresource.com
Phone: 650-242-8040
Website: https://www.selfmanagementresource.com/contact-smrc/


Practice-tested Support have available findings on program impact that are derived from practice in the form of evaluation data or reports. The Practice-tested support listed below meet the ADA criteria for support programming, align with the Standards of Care, and demonstrate positive outcomes.

Practice-tested Directory

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (4)Organization: Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service

Name of Program: Health Extension for Diabetes

Program Details

Program Description:
Health Extension for Diabetes is a community-based program delivered by Clemson University Cooperative Extension in partnership with Prisma Health-Upstate. The program provides participants with diabetes the education, resources, and support to better manage their diabetes. The main goal of the program is to empower and reinforce diabetes self-management. Participants will be empowered to improve quality of life, increase awareness of local services, receive up-to-date education, and reduce complications of diabetes. Group members meet every other week for four months to share successes, challenges, and learn the basics about diabetes. During the program, group members also receive ongoing support and health education through weekly phone calls. Education topics include healthy eating, physical activity, and other self-management skills. Group members encourage each other and learn coping and problem-solving strategies they have found to be successful. In addition, participants are provided with resources and assistance navigating the resources for ongoing diabetes self-management support.

Program Settings: Health Clinic/Hospital/Outpatient, Extension sites, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 1 diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English

(Video) 2022 American Diabetes Association Standards of Care in Diabetes

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Michelle Parisi
Email: mparisi@clemson.edu
Phone: 864-656-0331
Website: www.clemson.edu/extension/health/programs/health-extension-for-diabetes.html

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (5)Organization: Midwest Latino Health Research and Training and Policy Center at
University of Illinois at Chicago

Name of Program: Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP)

Program Details

Program Description:
The Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEPTM) was developed to address lack of diabetes literacy and self-management among ethnic and racial minorities. The DEEPTM model has three components: the training of trainers (TOT), the facilitator’s manual and the participant’s manual.
TOT is provided at three levels: Peer educator (PE), Lead trainer (LT) and Senior trainer (ST).

PE training covers the contents of the manual and reviews concepts of adult education and facilitation techniques. This 24 hr workshop is intended for community health workers or community members with no professional formal education. PEs facilitate workshops for patients or community residents.

Lead training is intended for professionals, or for those with supervisory roles over CHWs. This 24 hr workshop covers curriculum content, adult education, facilitation techniques, cultural competence, motivational interviewing and evaluation of CHWs. LTs may train CHWs and patients.

After three years, certified LTs may apply to become STs. They will be observed and evaluated in their skill and knowledge in conducting a 24 hr training for professionals. STs may train LTs, PEs and patients.

The facilitator’s manual covers in 8 modules the information on definition and types of diabetes, risk factors, self-monitoring, physical activity, healthy eating, diabetes complications, engaging the medical team, medications, psycho-social aspects of diabetes, depression, and self-advocacy. Each module includes lesson content, learning objectives; instructions for implementation of activities and check-list of materials. The manual also includes an implementation guide, a weekly action plan, evaluation forms, appendices (supplemental information), bibliography, glossary and online resources.

After the instructional phase, support groups led by facilitators meet bi-weekly to review curriculum content and activities, provide scientific updates, and encourage long-term maintenance of healthy behaviors.

Program Settings: Health Clinic/Hospital/Outpatient, Long-term care facility, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Prediabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English, Spanish

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Amparo Castillo
Email: amparo@uic.edu
Phone: 312-413-9490
Website: mwlatino.uic.edu/deep-program-2/

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (6) Organization: InquisitHealth

Name of Program: Diabetes Peer-to-Peer Mentoring program

Program Details

Program Description:
InquisitHealth partners with you to deliver individualized DSMS (diabetes self-management support) programs remotely to your patients living with diabetes. We proactively reach out and engage the patients you identify. The program is delivered 1-on-1 through ‘peer mentors’ - these are patients successfully living with diabetes who are trained to help others. Our program focuses on identifying and addressing barriers related to the social determinants of health and behavior change (S+BDoH). A mentor is chosen for each patient based on shared attributes like availability, language, race/ethnicity, and medication type. Together, through 1-on-1 phone-based coaching calls, SMS check-ins in between calls, and video-based educational materials, the mentors help patients fill in knowledge gaps, implement sustainable lifestyle changes, and overcome any personal and social challenges. The entire intervention is delivered via a HIPAA-compliant technology platform. Social determinants requiring additional support and collaboration are escalated securely to your professional staff (e.g., nurses, pharmacists, social workers) and/or vetted community programs. The primary objective of our DSMS intervention is to improve HbA1c sustainably through lasting changes in lifestyle.

Program Settings: Telemedicine

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 1 diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Ashwin Patel
Email: ashwin@inquisithealth.com
Phone: 646-893-1418
Website: www.inquisithealth.com

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (7) Organization: Gateway Community Health Center, Inc.

Name of Program: Gateway Diabetes Self-Management

Program Details

Program Description:
Gateway's Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Self-Management Program was designed to address the seriousness and prevalent chronic health conditions of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The goal of the program is to provide an effective training by utilizing a community-based, and culturally-sensitive approach to empower people towards the prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The program was developed by incorporating years of experience and eight self-management principles: 1) Active Learning; 2) Goal Setting; 3) Problem Solving; 4) Knowledge; 5) Responsibility; 6) Social Support; 7) Respect; and 8) Skill Building.
The program also promotes participation to make the learning process an enjoyable activity. The program is adaptable to the needs and resources of organizations working towards a common goal of health education and disease management.

The program includes a ten-session course designed to be delivered in a 2-hour session for ten consecutive weeks. The sessions include topics on nutrition, portion control, physical activity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease complications, self-monitoring, medications, and stress management.
Gateway Diabetes Self-Management Program provides facilitators with an extensive guide on the process to conduct the course sessions; in addition, a participant handbook is available to reinforce the course content.

(Video) American Diabetes Association: Providing Diabetes Support in Your Community

Program Settings: Health Clinic/Community Health Center, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, RD/CDE practice, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English, Spanish

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Otila Garcia
Email: otilag.gateway@tachc.org
Phone: 956-523-3691
Website: https://gatewaychc.com/diabetes-self-management-courses/

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (8) Organization: Pack Health

Name of Program: Pack Health Type 2 Diabetes Digital Coaching Program

Program Details

Program Description:
Pack Health utilizes a digital platform to deliver structured and personalized support that helps patients change behaviors, better manage their chronic conditions, and improve their health. Enrolled patients have no username or password to remember, they simply receive a weekly call from their personal Health Advisor along with digital nudges, sent via text message or email according to the patient’s communication preference. Nudges include reminders and messages of encouragement, evidence-based educational activities, and care coordination services. All calls and nudges included; Health Advisors have 60 scheduled touch points with each patient every 12 weeks. Within this same time frame, the platform collects over 100+ patient-reported outcomes (PROs) using validated survey instruments such as the PHQ-9, PROMIS, Diabetes Distress scale and symptom assessments. PROs are used to track efficacy and personalize coaching, content, and services. The Type 2 Diabetes curriculum is focused primarily on disease understanding, behavior change, overcoming social determinants of health barriers and managing blood sugars.

Program Settings: Virtual, Digital, Telehealth

Diabetes Focus:

  • Pre-diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies - click here for more information

Contact Information:
Dr. Dhiren Patel
Email: dhiren@packhealth.com
Phone: 781-956-3825
Website: packhealth.com

Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (9)

Organization: New Mexico State University

Name of Program: Kitchen Creations: A Cooking School for
People with Diabetes and their Families

Program Details

Program Description:
Kitchen Creations teaches adults how to plan and cook meals that are balanced to manage diabetes. The series includes four 3-hour sessions on:

  • Meal planning
  • Balancing carbohydrates
  • Vegetables, beans, and grains
  • Heart healthy cooking

Participants learn about these topics from a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator, or paraprofessional, as well as from each other. They engage in hands-on activities throughout each session to reinforce what they are learning. An Extension Agent leads them in working together to make 3-5 recipes, which form a healthy meal that models the concepts learned in the session. Participants serve themselves the recommended portions to practice plating balanced meals. They end each session by setting goals and begin the next session by sharing their progress.
Kitchen Creations is easy to adapt to any English- or Spanish-speaking population. The curriculum includes:

  • Instructor Guide
  • Participant Manual (English or Spanish)
  • Two cookbooks with recipes for people with diabetes (selected for each series from ADA cookbooks and an Extension cookbook of modified New Mexico recipes)
  • Optional PowerPoint slides (English or Spanish)
  • Optional pre-diabetes booklet (English and Spanish)

The information presented in the Participant Manual applies to all people with diabetes. Discussion questions, examples, learning activities, and recipes are chosen with specific communities and cultures in mind. The program is offered successfully in frontier, rural, and urban counties. Most classes are for the general population, but several series are offered to Native American/American Indian, African American/Black, and Hispanic/Latino communities each year.

Program Settings: Health Clinic/Hospital/Outpatient, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, RD/CDE Practice, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Gestational diabetes
  • Prediabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 1 diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 2 diabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered: English, Spanish

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use: Varies – contact Cassandra Vanderpool for information

Contact Information:
Cassandra Vanderpool, MS, RDN, LD
Email: cvpool@nmsu.edu
Phone: 575-202-5065
Website: kitchencreations.nmsu.edu

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Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (10)

(Video) American Diabetes Association video featuring Dr. Richard Rubin

Organization: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

Name of Program:Vivir en Control

Program Details

Program Description:

Vivir en Control is a culturally sensitive four-week diabetes self-management program targeting Hispanic/Latinos. The program is designed to activate participants so they may better control their diabetes by strengthening their social support environment. Vivir en Control is an evidence-informed curriculum that seeks to improve participants’ diabetes self-care, self-efficacy, and A1C. A focus of Vivir en Control is to address the emotional burden of diabetes.

Vivir en Control classes are approximately two hours long and taught by trained class leaders. An empowerment-based approach is used to create an interactive learning experience delivered with user-friendly information. Lessons include group discussions, meal planning, goal setting, problem-solving and application activities to practice lessons learned.

A unique feature of Vivir en Control is integrating a “care supporter” as part of the program. This person is someone the participant identifies as a person closely involved in their diabetes management. The participant and care supporter partner in class to learn healthy communication skills that are practiced at home. Care supporters are provided resources to aid in their role in supporting the participant.

Vivir en Control has been implemented in a variety of settings, including health clinics and community sites. A fee-based memo of understanding (MOU) agreement is required to adopt the program. After establishing an MOU, a class leader workshop is scheduled for the organization’s staff delivering the program.


Program Settings:Health Clinic/Hospital/Outpatient, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, RD/CDE Practice, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 2 Diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 1 Diabetes/19+ years old
  • Prediabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered:English, Spanish, Bilingual

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use:Varies. For more information contact the project director, Dr. Ninfa Peña-Purcell

Contact Information:
Dr. Ninfa Peña-Purcell
Email:ncpurcell@tamu.edu

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Diabetes Support Directory | American Diabetes Association (11)

Organization: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

Name of Program:Live in Control

Program Details

Program Description:

Live in Controlis a four-week diabetes self-management program designed to activate participants so they may better control their diabetes by strengthening their social support environment. Live in Control is an evidence-informed curriculum that seeks to improve participants’ diabetes self-care, self-efficacy, and A1C. A focus of Live in Control is to address the emotional burden of diabetes.

Live in Control classes are approximately two hours long and taught by trained class leaders. An empowerment-based approach is used to create an interactive learning experience delivered with user-friendly information. Lessons include group discussions, meal planning, goal setting, problem-solving and application activities to practice lessons learned.

A unique feature of Live in Control is integrating a “care supporter” as part of the program. This person is someone the participant identifies as a person closely involved in their diabetes management. The participant and care supporter partner in class to learn healthy communication skills that are practiced at home. Care supporters are provided resources to aid in their role in supporting the participant.

Live in Control has been implemented in a variety of settings, including health clinics and community sites. A fee-based memo of understanding (MOU) agreement is required to adopt the program. After establishing an MOU, a class leader workshop is scheduled for the organization’s staff delivering the program.


Program Settings:Health Clinic/Hospital/Outpatient, Church/Religious Site, Worksite, RD/CDE Practice, and Community/Senior Centers

Diabetes Focus:

  • Type 2 Diabetes/19+ years old
  • Type 1 Diabetes/19+ years old
  • Prediabetes/19+ years old

Languages Offered:English

Program Cost/Licensing/Terms of Use:Varies. For more information contact the project director, Dr. Ninfa Peña-Purcell

(Video) Finding Diabetes Support Resources in Your Community

Contact Information:
Dr. Ninfa Peña-Purcell
Email: ncpurcell@tamu.edu

FAQs

How many carbs should I eat to lower my A1C? ›

Diets containing 20–50 grams of carbs per day have also been shown to lower blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of disease in people with prediabetes ( 17 ).

Is the American Diabetes Association reliable? ›

This charity's score is 71.93, earning it a 2-Star rating. Charity Navigator believes donors can "Give with Confidence" to charities with 3- and 4-Star ratings.

What is the best carb counter for diabetics? ›

Healthline's picks for the best diabetes apps
  • MySugr. ...
  • Glucose Buddy. ...
  • Diabetes:M. iPhone rating: 4.6 stars. ...
  • Beat Diabetes. Android rating: 4.7 stars. ...
  • OneTouch Reveal. iPhone rating: 4.8 stars. ...
  • Diabetic Recipes. Android rating: 4.2 stars. ...
  • Glucose tracker — Diabetic diary. Android rating: 4.4 stars. ...
  • Diabetes. Android rating: 4.4 stars.

Should type 2 diabetics count carbs or net carbs? ›

American Diabetes Association Recommendations

If you have Type 1 Diabetes and do not use an insulin-to-carb ratio (ICR) or if you have Type 2 Diabetes: Count the Total Carbohydrates listed on the Nutrition Facts Label. Do not subtract any fiber or sugar alcohols.

How many slices of bread can a diabetic eat per day? ›

It is preferable not to eat white flour bread, but if you must, limit yourself to two medium slices. A slice of bread has about 32 calories in it. The total calories consumed from bread should not be more than 90 for a diabetic patient. Furthermore, diabetics should avoid eating white bread every day.

What foods to avoid if your A1C is high? ›

Worst Choices
  • Fried meats.
  • Higher-fat cuts of meat, such as ribs.
  • Pork bacon.
  • Regular cheeses.
  • Poultry with skin.
  • Deep-fried fish.
  • Deep-fried tofu.
  • Beans prepared with lard.
6 Dec 2020

What companies does the American Diabetes Association take money from? ›

Companies like Dannon (maker of Dannon yogurt) and Kraft (makers of Velveeta, Oscar Mayer weiners, Lunchables) are corporate sponsors of the American Diabetes Association. The American Cancer Society takes money from Tyson chicken, one of the biggest makers of processed chicken, and Yum!

Is the American Diabetes Association a government organization? ›

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a United States-based nonprofit that seeks to educate the public about diabetes and to help those affected by it through funding research to manage, cure and prevent diabetes (including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and pre-diabetes).

What is the best diabetes charity to donate to? ›

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) is the leading global organization funding innovative research to cure, prevent, and treat type 1 diabetes and its complications. If you want to make a difference and support a loved one, a friend, or yourself, you can simply donate to their cause.

How much sugar can a Type 2 diabetic have per day? ›

The maximum recommended daily amount of sugar is 30g for adults – which works out at just seven teaspoons a day. Given that a tablespoon of ketchup contains around one teaspoon of sugar, a chocolate biscuit has up to two, and a small serving of baked beans almost three, you can see how quickly the teaspoons tot up.

How many carbs can a Type 2 diabetic have per day? ›

According to the CDC, people living with diabetes should get about 45% of their total calories each day from carbohydrates. For females, they recommend 3–4 servings of carbohydrates, at 15 grams (g) per serving. For males, they recommend a slightly higher amount of 4–5 servings. This is equivalent to 45–75 g each meal.

How many grams of sugar is a diabetic allowed per day? ›

Not exceeding the maximum amount of calories per day – 2,000 calories per day for women and 2,500 calories per day for men. Reducing sugar intake to a maximum of 6 teaspoons per day (25g). Reducing the consumption of sugars-sweetened beverages.

How many carbs should a diabetic have for breakfast? ›

Most adults with diabetes aim for 45-60 grams of carbs per meal and 15-20 grams per snack. That number may go up or down, depending on how active you are and the medicines you take, so check with your doctor or a registered dietitian.

How many calories should a diabetic eat per day? ›

Patients with Type 2 diabetes usually are put on a 1500-1800 calorie diet per day to promote and /or maintain the ideal body weight. This may vary however, depending on the person's age, sex, activity level, current weight and body style.

Do diabetics count carbs or sugar? ›

Carbohydrates are complex sugars. Many people with diabetes need to count the number of carbohydrates in each serving of food to control their blood sugar levels. People refer to this as carb counting.

Are baked potatoes OK for diabetics? ›

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? Although potatoes are a starchy vegetable, a person with diabetes can still enjoy them as part of a healthful diet.

Are grapes good for diabetics? ›

Grapes are adored, nourishing fruits and are safe for diabetics. People can eat them and add them to their diabetic diets as they do not harm or spike glucose levels. Consuming grapes help to reduce the susceptibility to developing type 2 diabetes.

Are tomatoes okay for diabetics? ›

Tomatoes are not high in sugar, and neither are carrots. Tomatoes, similar to carrots, are considered a non-starchy vegetable in meal planning for diabetes. This means that the amount of naturally occurring sugar is minimal in a serving.

What foods can diabetics eat freely list? ›

What foods can I eat if I have diabetes?
  • vegetables. nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes. ...
  • fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes.
  • grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains. ...
  • protein. ...
  • dairy—nonfat or low fat.

What bread is good for diabetics? ›

The American Diabetes Association recommends choosing whole grain bread or 100 percent whole wheat bread instead of white bread. White bread is made from highly processed white flour and added sugar. Here are some delicious and healthy breads to try: Joseph's Flax, Oat Bran and Wheat Pita Bread.

What kind of meat is best for diabetics? ›

Lean meat
  • some beef cuts, such as sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, and chipped beef.
  • lean pork, such as fresh, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, and tenderloin.
  • veal, except for veal cutlets.
  • poultry, including chicken, turkey, and Cornish hen (without skin)
9 Aug 2020

What does the American Diabetes Association do with donations? ›

Your donations are critical in helping us: Protect lives through advocacy efforts to ensure every person with diabetes has equitable access to safe and affordable health care. Save lives by funding critical research to develop life-changing treatment for those living with diabetes today—until the day we find a cure.

What is the average cost of diabetes medication? ›

The real bulk of patient spending depends on how much medication is needed to manage the condition. On average, diabetes patients with insurance who can manage their condition without insulin spend about $160 on diabetes medication each year, while patients taking at least 1 insulin spend about $512 each year.

How much does type 2 diabetes cost per year? ›

People with diagnosed diabetes incur average medical expenditures of $16,752 per year, of which about $9,601 is attributed to diabetes. On average, people with diagnosed diabetes have medical expenditures approximately 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes.

Is the American Diabetes Association peer reviewed? ›

It is an open access journal committed to publishing high-quality basic and clinical research articles regarding type 1 and type 2 diabetes and associated complications. Submissions are subject to rigorous external peer review to ensure the publication of high-quality information.

How old is the American Diabetes Association? ›

Mission. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation's leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

Can walking cure diabetes? ›

Research studies have shown that walking can be beneficial in bringing down blood glucose and therefore improving diabetes control. In a study involving people with type 1 diabetes, participants were assigned to either take a 30 minute walk after eating or have the same meal but remain inactive.

How much money does the American Diabetes Association make? ›

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported the receipt of $181 million in revenue in 2015, which primarily came from 5 sources: $135 million (75% of revenue): Contributions, Gifts, and Grants. $32 million (18% of revenue): Subscriptions, Reg, Sales, and Booth Rentals.

How much of my JDRF donation goes to research? ›

RESEARCH FUNDING

JDRF spent $29 million to fund research grants and the T1D Fund made $15 million worth of investments in companies that are conducting T1D research. In total, 18% of JDRF's total income in 2021 was used to directly fund research, compared to 45% in 2019 and 2020.

What desserts can diabetics eat? ›

Examples of some diabetes-friendly desserts include:
  • granola (with no sugar added) and fresh fruit.
  • trail mix with nuts, seeds, roasted pepitas, and dried cranberries.
  • graham crackers with nut butter.
  • angel food cake.
  • chia seed pudding.
  • low sugar avocado mousse.
  • frozen yogurt bites made with plain Greek yogurt and berries.

What can diabetics eat when craving something sweet? ›

Diabetes: 8 Sweet Snacks Safe For Diabetics
  • Cocoa nut butter. Cocoa powder is a great addition to your diet. ...
  • Chia pudding. Chia pudding is another great addition to your diet thanks to its numerous health benefits. ...
  • Apple & nut butter. ...
  • Dark chocolate. ...
  • Green yogurt. ...
  • Pears. ...
  • Oatmeal bites. ...
  • Fruit popsicles.
1 Jun 2022

Can type 2 diabetes be reversed? ›

According to recent research, type 2 diabetes cannot be cured, but individuals can have glucose levels that return to non-diabetes range, (complete remission) or pre-diabetes glucose level (partial remission) The primary means by which people with type 2 diabetes achieve remission is by losing significant amounts of ...

Do tortilla chips raise blood sugar? ›

These can be hard for people with diabetes to navigate for two reasons: Tortilla chips can raise blood sugars quickly. We often eat more than we realize which can lead to eating more carbohydrates than we planned.

How long does it take to reverse prediabetes? ›

Losing weight and reversing prediabetes can take anywhere from a few weeks, to a few months, to a few years, but the window of time to reverse prediabetes after a diagnosis is between 2-6 years – so you have time!

Is Pasta Good for diabetes? ›

Though it's higher in carbohydrates than some other foods, pasta can fit into a healthy meal plan for someone with diabetes, says Toby Smithson, RDN, a certified diabetes care and education specialist (CDCES) in Hilton Head, South Carolina, and author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.

Is Honey Good For diabetes? ›

Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes.

Are Type 2 diabetics allowed any sugar? ›

According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes can still have sweets, chocolate, or other sugary foods as long they are eaten as part of a healthful meal plan or combined with exercise. They consider a healthful meal plan to: have limited saturated fat. contain moderate amounts of salt and sugar.

Will Low Carb lower A1C? ›

In summary, the 30%-carbohydrate diet over 6 months led to a remarkable reduction in HbA1c levels, even among outpatients with severe type 2 diabetes, without any insulin therapy, hospital care or increase in sulfonylureas. The effectiveness of the diet may be comparable to that of insulin therapy.

What should I eat to lower my A1C? ›

spreading out carbohydrate-rich foods throughout the day. choosing less-processed or whole foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts. eating a balanced diet complete with healthy proteins, fats, and carbohydrates.

How can I lower my A1C in 30 days? ›

7 Ways to Improve Your A1C
  1. Exercise. Physical activity helps your body use insulin more efficiently, so it can better process the glucose in your blood. ...
  2. Eat Right. ...
  3. Take Medications as Prescribed. ...
  4. Manage Your Stress. ...
  5. Stick to a Schedule. ...
  6. Drink in Moderation. ...
  7. Monitor Your Numbers.

Can not eating enough raise blood sugar? ›

Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets.

Does apple cider vinegar lower A1C? ›

The review reports that apple cider vinegar caused a small, significant reduction in HbA1c results after 8–12 weeks. HbA1c levels reflect a person's blood glucose levels over many weeks or months.

Is peanut butter good for diabetics? ›

Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes. Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high-carbohydrate or high-GL foods.

Does lemon water reduce blood sugar? ›

Lemon juice significantly lowered the mean blood glucose concentration peak by 30% (p < 0.01) and delayed it more than 35 min (78 vs. 41 min with water, p < 0.0001).

Which vegetables should be avoided in diabetes? ›

People living with diabetes should look to avoid vegetables with a high GI rating, as the body absorbs blood sugar from those foods much quicker compared with low-GI foods. This includes artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, celery, cauliflower, eggplant/aubergine, green beans, lettuce, peppers, snow peas and spinach.”

At what A1C level does damage start? ›

5 Blood vessel damage can start at A1C levels above 7%. The risk of complications significantly increases at A1Cs above 9%.

Are grapes good for diabetics? ›

Grapes are adored, nourishing fruits and are safe for diabetics. People can eat them and add them to their diabetic diets as they do not harm or spike glucose levels. Consuming grapes help to reduce the susceptibility to developing type 2 diabetes.

What is normal A1C for a 70 year old? ›

The key measure of diabetes control is hemoglobin A1c. For healthy over 65ers with long life expectancy, the target should be 7.0 – 7.5%.

How do you feel if your A1C is high? ›

Symptoms
  • Increased thirst.
  • Frequent urination.
  • Increased hunger.
  • Fatigue.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Numbness or tingling in the feet or hands.
  • Frequent infections.
  • Slow-healing sores.
17 Mar 2022

How fast can A1C drop in 3 months? ›

The good news is that if your A1C is on the high side, say, 10% or higher, it will likely start to drop within two to three months (in other words, the higher it is, the faster it comes down). On the other hand, if your A1C is 7.5%, it may take a little longer to lower A1C levels.

Videos

1. American Diabetes Association Session on Diabetes
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2. Support People Living with Diabetes in Ukraine!
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3. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2022 Update for Early Career Professionals
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4. Rethinking Your Plate with American Diabetes Association
(Walmart)
5. Know Diabetes by Heart Presents 2022 ADA Standards of Care
(American Diabetes Association)
6. Dr Ruth Weinstock - American Diabetes Association Address - 81st Scientific Sessions
(Upstate Medical University)

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